Physical Therapy Web
>> Go To Physical Therapy Web HOME PAGE <<

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

Outline · [ Standard ] · Linear+

> Therapeutic Ultrasound, The Basics of Therapeutic Ultrasound

admin
post Jun 9 2005, 09:52 PM
Post #1


User Level


Group: Admin
Posts: 64
Joined: 7-April 04
Member No.: 2



Please post any comments on this article (Therapeutic Ultrasound) by replying here.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Guest
post Jul 19 2005, 07:24 PM
Post #2


Unregistered









There is enough evidence in the literature to support the claim that ultrasound is safe over metal implants because the soundwaves do not vibrate the metal to cause increased heating. Although, there is evidence that ultrasound can cause increased heating of plastic implants and cemented joints.
Reference: Cameron, Michelle, (2003) Physical Agent Modalities: from Research to Practice
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
physio assistant
post Jun 6 2006, 01:05 PM
Post #3


Unregistered









mad.gif
This is an awful article. I have been a physio assistant for 9 years and have done more than 5,000 ultrasounds. The information given in this article are completely broad ranged. I lost all confidence in this document when I read "tendonitis or (tendinitis) which ever you prefer" There is one word and thats tendon. There are not 2 dofferent types of TENDONS in the body. Like what is a TENDIN anyways?? And at no given time should an ultrasound only take 3 minutes. You mise well spend those minutes applying a heating pad because the ultrasound will take no affect in such time.

For real facts ask your local physiotherapist before typing again!
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Guest
post Jun 6 2006, 01:07 PM
Post #4


Unregistered









P.S---- CHOTA
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
horizon
post Oct 24 2006, 11:01 AM
Post #5


User Level


Group: Members
Posts: 1
Joined: 24-October 06
Member No.: 100,554



ultra sonic to produce heat sould be in continous mood
1 mhz is deeper more than 3 mhz
uses as pain relif , antinflamatory,breaking adhesion and muscl spasm

User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
mdquack
post Oct 2 2008, 02:12 PM
Post #6


User Level


Group: Members
Posts: 1
Joined: 30-September 08
Member No.: 127,755



QUOTE(admin @ Jun 9 2005, 09:52 PM)
Please post any comments on this article (Therapeutic Ultrasound) by replying here.
*


This artical is very poorly written. First off theraputic ultrasound frequency ranges from .8 to 3 MHz. The most common ones are 1 MHz and 3 Mhz.

While the ultrasound waves do produce vibration they should not produce "cavatation". Cavatation is the formation of air bubbles caused by sound waves passing though a liquid. If the theraputic ultrasound was used to cause cavatation it would most likely cause an embolizm and kill the patient.

The vibation and heating effect are caused by the ultrasound. The secondary effects of tissue relaxation, increased local bloodflow and scar tissue breakdown are due to the vibation and heating not separate effects as the author insinuates.

Ultrasound treatments times should be based on the area they are covering but not longer that 15 minutes. The general rule is 2.5 minutes for a treatment area 2.5 times the size of the treatment head. Most theraputic treatments are 5 to 10 minutes according to the area to be treated.

The sharp pain that occurs as ultrasound is done over a fracture would be caused do the the sound waves bouncing off the bone - which will not conduct the sound waves. These sound waves bounce back and aggravate the periosteum which is the layer over the bone that is full of nerves and blood vessels. The nerves are aggravated by the increased heat and pain is the result. The sound waves dont become trapped in the layers of the bone. Even if this did occur, bone tissue has no nerve endings within the bone itself so it wouldnt be felt if it did occur.


User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
admin
post Oct 3 2008, 06:33 AM
Post #7


User Level


Group: Admin
Posts: 64
Joined: 7-April 04
Member No.: 2



QUOTE(physio assistant @ Jun 6 2006, 02:05 PM)
mad.gif
I lost all confidence in this document when I read "tendonitis or (tendinitis) which ever you  prefer" There is one word and  thats tendon. There are not 2 dofferent types of TENDONS in the body. Like what is a TENDIN anyways??
*



Thanks for the feedback. Please do note that both 'tendonitis' and 'tendinitis' are accepted spellings when describing inflammation of a tendon. If you don't want to take my word for it you can read the definition of 'Tendinitis' found here at the Mayoclinic.com .
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicTopic OptionsStart new topic
 

Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd July 2014 - 11:04 AM